215-399-9769
millennial mortgage shopping

Three reasons millennials don’t shop for mortgages

It never fails.  Millennial buys a home, thinks all is good in the world and only then realizes they just got taken to the cleaners on their mortgage.  They are then stuck in a loan with an unnecessarily high payment every month for years to come. How did they end up in that situation?  Why didn’t they take time to explore mortgage options?  Here are the top three reasons millennials don’t shop for mortgages.

1. “I was scared by my real estate agent”

A millennial may never admit it, but they are subject to human emotions just like the rest of us. When it comes to a big purchase, such as a home, it is human nature to want to avoid risk. Some agents take advantage of this and inject questionable statements like this:

  • “Our in-house lender is always the best.”
  • “Her service is great and she’ll be at closing, nobody else ever does that.”
  • “Those online lenders, stay away!  They’ll never close on time!”
  • “Our in-house lender will shop rates for you, you don’t need to.”

Facts: Discouraging a home buyer from mortgage shopping is 100% unethical – and could even be illegal!  There are many incredible loan originators out there and many attend closings regularly. A single lender or broker can’t shop mortgage rates for you (learn why).

To understand why a real estate agent may steer a borrower to a specific lender, let’s follow the money!

The money trail

A real estate agent makes money when a house is sold or bought via commissions. The rate and loan program obtained by the homebuyer is irrelevant to the real estate agent’s income.  Their primary goal is to get the transaction done.  Until that moment, they haven’t earned a penny.

Additionally, many real estate agents have co-marketing agreements with specific mortgage lenders, brokers or loan originators. If these mortgage professionals don’t see an ROI on their investment of marketing dollars, the real estate agent stands to lose at least part of their marketing presence.  Therefore, the real estate agent wants to “feed” the mortgage professional to continue the financially beneficial co-marketing arrangement. 

With these in mind, is it any wonder that an agent will aggressively push you to a specific lender or mortgage broker?

Not all agents are the same

While many tech disrupters offering flat fees or “no-commissions” on real estate sales solves some of the problems, one major money problem remains.  Despite the removal of commissions, real estate agents may still be receiving funds from a mortgage broker or lender in the form of a co-marketing agreement or “MSA”.  This means they will still push a homebuyer to a specific lender, robbing them of the opportunity to shop for their mortgage.

How can this problem be solved?  You simply need to find an ethical real estate agent who isn’t “hooked” on the money coming from one specific lender.  Before you legally engage with any real estate agent, simply ask this question: “Do you receive money from any specific mortgage broker or lender?”

If the answer is “yes”, walk away and find someone else who will be just as interested in helping you save money on your mortgage as they will in finding you the house of your dreams.

2. “I used an app”

Every lender claims to have the tech to close your loan faster than you can say “mortgage transaction.” Can they really?  And if they can, who is actually the winner of this perceived huge investment in technology?  Do lenders make these massive investments purely for the consumer experience?

No, they sure don’t.

Fact: The shorter your loan is in processing, the lower the likelihood you’ll shop around or be solicited by other lenders and brokers.

Avoiding competition is a good thing for mortgage lenders and brokers, but not consumers.  When a millennial decides to not consider alternatives, voluntarily or involuntarily, the lender or broker wins.  The government has been fighting to help consumers shop for years, instituting more robust disclosure time periods and new documents – but the tech industry has quickly outpaced any government intervention.

Tech helps you shop too

Fortunately, the digitization of mortgages has made mortgage shopping easier provided you can avoid the common pitfalls.

Pitfall 1: Sharing your name, email and phone number with shopping sites who send it to multiple lenders.  This will get you bombarded with calls and you’ll wish you never uttered the words mortgage.

Pitfall 2: Shopping over the course of several days.  Rates change every day, so an apples-to-apples comparison is always essential.

Pitfall 3: Shopping while uninformed.  We tend to consider the use of a mortgage concierge a good thing but hey, we may be biased 🙂

Solutions to mortgage shopping

So, how can this problem be solved?  Fair warning, the answer may require that you have a conversation with an actual human at some point who isn’t your parent or friend who doesn’t know a lick about mortgages.

Solution 1: Our particular solution is to use MortgageCS’ concierge program which is free and provides education and insights from day 1 of your shopping through your loan closing.

Solution 2: Other options are becoming a mortgage expert by holding numerous conversations with many banks, lenders, and brokers all while resisting the urge to have your credit pulled numerous times and getting bombarded with follow-up calls and emails.  Grow thicker skin and don’t be afraid to say “no” and you’ll be all set here.

3. “I am subject to advertising”

It may be hard to admit, but marketing messages can impact everyone – even tech-enabled millennials.  From TV spots to billboards and creative event sponsoring, mortgage companies are investing more and more each year to maintain scale and keep their operations growing.  After all, they have an investor base or shareholders to keep happy.

Remember this: A mortgage is a single transaction, creating a predetermined amount of income. It follows that a company with lower costs and all else equal could deliver a better mortgage rate and fee structure.  While company size and other factors can sometimes influence this, you should read this first: Do mortgage brokers act in their customers best interest?

Now that you know the three reasons millennials don’t shop for mortgages – you can ensure you don’t fall victim to the same influences!

Share this to help your friends – they can use their savings to take you to a nice dinner one day!

Compare HELOCs using a margin

Why margins matter in a HELOC

Let’s take a look at what a margin is and why margins matter in a HELOC (Home Equity Line of Credit).  For the purpose of this post on April 20th, 2018, we’ll be using the HELOC page found here.

HELOC margins range

What we see on the HELOC page is that margins can range quite a bit. In some cases, margins are as low as -1.25.  Other margins show as high as +1.00.  What does this mean when it comes to a HELOC and why is it important?

A real-world HELOC example

Let’s take a look at an analysis for a client that may be interested in obtaining a $100,000 line of credit.  Here it is:

 

In this particular analysis, we will be comparing a “High Margin” and “Lower Margin” line of credit.   In both cases, the Prime Rate is the same because it is not set by the bank.  The margin, on the other hand, is set by the bank offering the line of credit.  This is where you see a range of options.

The High Margin HELOC

The High Margin HELOC shows a margin of 0.50 percent.  When we add this number to the prime rate, we can see that our effective interest rate is 5.25%.  This interest rate will be charged until the prime rate moves up or down.  Any movement in the prime rate will simply move the Interest Rate by the same amount.

In this specific case, a client borrowing $100,000 at a 5.25% rate will need to pay $437.50 each month.

Lower Margin HELOC

When we compare the lower margin line of credit, with a margin of -1.25%, we see that the same client may end up paying just $291.67 per month.  This lower margin results in a savings of nearly $146.00 each month.

2018 Tax Rules may make this more important

Historically, any interest associated with a line of credit could be written off against income. Said another way, a homeowner who obtained a line of credit wasn’t “really” paying the interest rate they were given.  This is because they were able to deduct the interest payments from their earned income and receive a tax refund as a result.

The new tax laws starting in 2018 have changed the laws for HELOCs.  Now, there are many instances where the interest paid towards a HELOC may no longer be tax deductible. Due to this, it is more important than ever to consider savings that may be available from a HELOC with a lower margin.

HELOCs for Wealth Management Clients

Next, let’s examine a $250,000 Home Equity Line of Credit.

 

 

The same margins from above show that a savings of $364.58 is possible between a high margin HELOC and lower margin HELOC.

Cost and Shopping HELOCs

Home Equity Lines of Credit are easy to obtain and the costs to obtain them are either $0 or less than a few hundred dollars.  All else equal, it is important to understand how shopping the margins between HELOCs can have a substantial impact on monthly free cash flow.

If you’d like to evaluate lines of credit in the Philadelphia area, go here.

Purchase Mortgages MortgageCS

3 keys to understanding purchase mortgages

Wondering how to buy a home and don’t know where to start?  You aren’t alone in your quest to understand the home-buying process.  Those looking to buy a home can quickly become overwhelmed resulting in burnout.  The best way to avoid information overload is to walk before you run.  Here are the 3 keys to understanding purchase mortgages.

Key 1: What is a mortgage?

A mortgage loan is a loan that is used to purchase a home.   A borrower will obtain a mortgage from a bank or other lending institution in lieu of using all cash to purchase the home.  Just as someone could finance the purchase of a car, would-be homebuyers can finance the purchase of a home.

When a mortgage is used by a borrower, the bank or lending institution will place a lien on the property’s title.  This is not a bad thing! When mortgages are secured by a home’s title, they become less risky.  Lower risk means the banks will offer more favorable interest rates when compared to personal loans that are not secured by any property. Lower interest rates will translate into lower payments, and that is a great thing!

The exact term “mortgage” refers to a specific document that is created and recorded as a public record:

A mortgage is a legal document creating a lien on a property after an agreement is reached between a borrower and lender. The mortgage becomes a public record document at the county’s office and secures a property as collateral in consideration for funds borrowed.

How does a mortgage help homebuyers?

Without mortgage loans, buying a home with cash would be the only option. Yikes!

With mortgage loans, buying a home is much more manageable. Would-be buyers will use cash to pay only a portion of the home’s purchase price.  This is called the down payment.  It is also typical that a buyer will pay at least a portion of the closing costs out of their cash.  Take a look below for a simple example regarding a $200,000 home purchase.

Purchase mortgages

 

In the example above, purchasing a $200,000 home results in a $160,000 mortgage and $50,000 cash required at closing.  This $50,000 includes $40,000 for a down payment and $10,000 as closing costs.

Key 2: What is a debt ratio?

Debt ratios matter a great deal when qualifying for a purchase mortgage.  The bank or lender requires proof that you can manage your soon-to-be housing payment. They’ll look for this proof by comparing your monthly debts to your monthly income and establishing a debt ratio. Your monthly debts will be obtained from your credit report and your monthly income will be calculated using paystubs and recent W2 statements.

Once a debt ratio is calculated, it is typically converted into a percentage. A debt ratio that is too high will either restrict the loan programs you may have access to or disqualify you completely. Yikes!

Two different debt ratio calculations?

The front-end debt ratio examines all debts except for those associated with the new housing payment. The back-end debt ratio will examine all debts and include a soon-to-be housing payment. A back-end debt ratio below 43 percent is typically low enough to have access to virtually all loan programs. Once a debt ratio exceeds 43 percent, loan program availability will be reduced drastically.

 

MortgageCS Debt Ratio

Debt Ratio Example

Assume you earn $10,000 monthly and have a car payment of $400 and student loan payments of $400 each month.  Your front end ratio will be ($400+$400)/$6,400 = 12.5%.  This number is far below the typical requirement of 31% for FHA loan front-end debt ratios.

Add in a new housing payment of $1,600 and the back-end debt ratio becomes ($800 + $1,600)/$6,400 = 37.5%.  This ratio is approaching the limit for of 43% but still within a reasonable range to obtain access to most loan programs.

Important Tip: When calculating a debt ratio, mortgage lenders will use gross income (income before taxes). 

Key 3: What goes into a mortgage payment?

A monthly mortgage payment is typically made up of four key components: principal, interest, taxes, and insurance. These four items are commonly referred to as PITI.  Phonetically, PITI is pronounced “pity.”

PITI explained

Principal and interest will be calculated based on your starting loan balance and the interest rate associated with your loan.  Taxes refers to the real estate taxes associated with the property.  Insurance refers to the cost of the homeowners insurance required to protect the property. Homeowners insurance is a requirement when a mortgage is used to buy a property.  This is because the mortgage lender needs to ensure the collateral (your home) is protected.

 

Mortgage PITI

 

If you put down less than 20 percent of the purchase price when you buy a home you may need to add mortgage insurance to this number.  You also may need to add monthly association dues if you purchase a condo, townhouse or any property included in an association.  Since you know the basics of PITI now, these are simple to add to your monthly required payment.

What’s next?

You now have a firm understanding of mortgages, debt ratios and the components of a mortgage payment. Armed with this information, you can now continue your learning with ease – good luck!

save on your mortgage payment

Reduce your mortgage payment in 2018: 3 options

If you like what you see, please let us know by sharing (use links above), thanks!

Taking steps to improve financial wellness is a resolution for many of us. Families want to save more and spend less. Between student loan debt and cell phone bills, it can be challenging to find opportunities to save. Homeowners, however, may have several options within reach.  These are the three ways to reduce a mortgage payment in 2018.

Reduce your mortgage payment: 3 options

Want to spend less on your mortgage each month? Sure, who wouldn’t!?  There are a few ways to obtain relief.  Each option has important short and long-term considerations.

Re-cast your mortgage loan

Re-casting a mortgage restarts the mortgage term. Imagine for a moment that you have paid the first ten years of your 30-year mortgage. You will have just twenty years remaining. A recast would spread your remaining balance over thirty years rather than the current remaining term of twenty years. The result is a lower monthly mortgage payment.

Re-casting is different than refinancing.  A re-cast can only be done by the lending institution currently servicing your mortgage loan. It may involve a pre-paid interest fee or “re-cast” fee. The charge is typically far less than the cumulative fees associated with a traditional refinance transaction. Another important difference is that a re-cast will typically not require an appraisal.  For those that purchased a home at the peak of the market, this may be an important consideration.

Re-casting a mortgage loan will reset the mortgage amortization schedule.  [Why this is important] Using the example from above, you would extend your mortgage payments for ten additional years. Rather than paying your slightly higher mortgage payment for twenty years, you’ll pay a lower amount for thirty years. This can make sense for many, particularly those who are likely to move in less than twenty years.

Eliminate mortgage insurance

Mortgage insurance can be required on conventional mortgages or FHA loans. Homebuyers who currently pay mortgage insurance may be able to eliminate the requirement, saving money each month.

Homeowners interested in removing mortgage insurance must meet certain criteria. Depending on the type of loan, the current balance must be equal or less than seventy-eight or eighty percent of the home value. Said another way, homeowners will need to have at least twenty percent equity in their home. Because mortgage insurance can cost $100 or more, this can be a great way to free up cash flow.

The process of eliminating mortgage insurance involves interaction with your current servicing company. By speaking with them, you’ll learn what is needed and how much it may cost.  Your loan servicer may require an appraisal to confirm the current value of your home.  Your loan servicer may also use the value of your home at the time of purchase. Eliminating mortgage insurance is a simple way to save money each month.

Refinance your mortgage

Reducing a mortgage payment is most commonly achieved with a rate and term refinance. Homeowners will often reduce interest rates and extend loan terms providing for substantial monthly savings. Refinance mortgages are also flexible, allowing many goals to be achieved in one transaction.

The most common way to save money with a refinance is by lowering the interest rate.  All else being equal, a lower interest rate will require a lower monthly payment.  Since 2007, rates have remained relatively low which means most mortgages are already in the 3.5% to 4.5% range.  If your mortgage is in this range, you may not save money by reducing the interest rate alone.

Similar to a re-cast, refinancing into a longer term may also save you money each month in the short term. Similar to the example above, a loan extended from twenty years to thirty years will have a lower monthly payment with all else being equal. Extending the term of a mortgage can save you money each month even when the new interest rate may be higher than your current rate.

When refinancing a current mortgage, it is important to factor in the costs of the transaction as well as the long-term impacts. For example, those within twenty years of retirement may not benefit by obtaining a new 30-year mortgage loan. Additionally, a monthly savings of $50 or $75 may not be enough to warrant a rate and term refinance.  Each mortgage scenario is different, and several variables can impact the options available.

There you have it! Three ways to reduce a mortgage payment in 2018.

Thanks for reading, and we hope you found this valuable.  Share with your network below!

3 must do’s after a weekend of house hunting

It’s Monday…and you’ve just had an exhilarating weekend of house hunting. You’ve seen the good, the bad, and just about everything else while driving all around town. Some of the properties you just walked through may already be under contract – so you can cross them off your list!

A weekend of house hunting can be quite discouraging in a seller’s market. So how can you keep your head up when you feel like you are fighting a losing battle? Do these three things each Monday – and you’ll be ready to act when the time is right.

Catalogue the properties you viewed

Document the property address, style of home, list price, best attributes & other important details. Ask yourself this question: What kept you from being interested in the property or what made you want it?

By doing this, you’ll find that certain property features will come to the surface as most important. This will help guide your future searching and make you more confident (so you can act more quickly next time).

Check in with your Realtor

Contact your trusted Realtor to talk through the properties that were most attractive to you.  After learning of a small price change or other information, a “maybe” on your list could turn into a “yes!”

If you do find yourself interested in a property, the time to act is now. You can request a second showing or cut to the chase and get a purchase contract written up! Remember, you aren’t the only one eyeing that property in this seller’s market – so act quickly.

Stay current on mortgage rates

Interest rates change at least every day, and can swing drastically over the course of a week. A small change in interest rate can make a BIG difference in monthly payment – so staying up to date on available mortgage rates and programs is a must!

For example, the monthly payment on a $350,000 mortgage will drop by $26 if rates are just 0.125% lower! That’s a savings of $312 a year – or about one free car payment!

Just as it is important to shop lenders early in the process, it is also important to keep your knowledge level up as you hunt for that perfect home. After all, a dip in mortgage rates will make all homes more affordable.

Related posts:

What is a seller’s market? Look here.

Concerned about increasing interest rates?  Look here.

3 ways to keep your payment the same when rates are on the rise

When it comes to mortgages and the home buying process, interest rates are almost always front and center. This is not a surprising thing, as nothing else impacts the housing market quite like a quick rise (or drop) in mortgage interest rates.  Additionally, mortgage interest rates are one of the most commonly compared terms when consumers shop lenders and loan officers.

For most first time buyers, sticking to a budget is essential. So what is one to do when rates suddenly increase?  Well, there are a few options – some a bit easier to consider than the others.

Look for smaller homes in the same area

If your heart is set on purchasing a home in a particular area, interest rates have recently increased AND you are on a fixed budget, there is little you can do but search for a lower priced home. If you were looking for a townhouse, this may mean you need to reduce the bedroom and bathroom count or perhaps even switch to consider condominium units. You may no longer be able to afford a home with the upgrades you hoped to include or perhaps you can no longer afford the unit with a basement or garage.  In either case, some level of sacrifice will need to be made as the macro-environment of interest rates increases.

Look for homes in a less expensive area

Maybe your heart isn’t set on buying a home in a particular area – but rather the home’s amenities are front and center. If this sounds like you, then it may be easy to consider a home in a different school district, township or even over state lines (if applicable). Keep in mind that the school district can be a very important factor in reselling a property – so a bargain price today may be more difficult to sell in the future (and may appreciate at a slower rate overall).

Delay buying until next year

No real estate professional wants to see you delay the purchase of a home – and perhaps you don’t want to either. However, if you are set on a certain property type and location for your new home, this may be the most viable option provided that you can save money at a rate that will outpace the appreciation on the home and any subsequent increases in interest rates. Note: This may be a HUGE amount and ultimately be unknown until a time in the future. 

Keep in mind there are some significant risks with delaying the purchase of a home. First, the interest rate environment is largely unpredictable and rates could increase further – actually making the home less affordable next year.  Second, home prices could increase which translates to you spending more over the life of your loan, and missing out on a year’s worth of home value appreciation. Third, there is no way to know what the home inventory may look like.  If there are homes you would consider purchasing today, there is no way to guarantee the inventory will be available next year (Just ask anyone that wanted to buy a house in 2016 and waited until 2017 when inventories were down 40%!).